Arc Flash Hazard Analysis / Risk Assessment

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  1. What are the steps involved in Arc Flash Analysis? A. Arc Flash Hazard Analysis or Risk Assessment is a study conducted by trained safety experts to analyze electric equipment and power systems in order to predict the amount of incident energy from an arc flash. According to IEEE std 1584, there are 9 steps involved in this Arc Flash Analysis, which we are going to discuss here. Step 1: Collect the system’s installation data: The largest effort in an arc-flash hazard study is collecting the data from the site. Start by reviewing the one-line diagrams and electric equipment, site, and layout arrangement with people who are familiar with the site. The diagrams have to be updated to show the current system configuration and orientation before the arc-flash study starts. The one-line diagrams must have all alternate feeds. If SLDs are not ready, prepare them.              Once the diagrams are completed in the basic electric system scheme, enter  the data needed for the short

How to do Industrial Earthing for Electrical Equipment


What is Electrical earthing?

How to do Industrial Earthing for Electrical Equipment?

These are the two burning questions in every electrical maintenance engineer mind. Electrical earthing system design in industries plays a vital role in protecting the equipment and workmen from damage. We need to determine the number of layers by conducting a proper soil resistivity test for the proper design of earthing. A traditional design of earthing, considering uniform layer structure may not always be applicable. Substations in the electrical networks and transformer yards in the facility require high beamed earthing. We also need to ensure that our earthing system is safe and economic as well. The optimal designing of the system using simulation techniques and IEEE-80 sheets will facilitate us with the proper and safe earthing.

Earthing is the method of transmitting the instant electricity discharge directly to the ground through low resistance wires or electrical cables by providing an easy path to dissipate the current to the ground. This is one of the significant features of electrical networks. Because it builds the most eagerly accessible and risky power source much secure to utilize.

Various Types of Electrical Earthing Systems
The complexity in the earth layers and various kinds of industrial sites demand different type of earthing practice. A standard and traditional earthing may not work for all types of sites. The process of Earthing or electrical grounding can be done in several ways like wiring in factories, housing, other machines, and electrical equipment. these are the different types of electrical earthing systems

Plate Earthing System
In this type of system, a plate is made up of copper or GI (galvanized iron) which are placed vertically in the ground pit less than 3meters from the earth. For a better electrical grounding system, one should maintain the earth moisture condition around the plate earthing system.










Pipe Earthing System
A galvanized steel based pipe is placed vertically in a wet is known as pipe earthing, and it is the most common type of earthing system. The pipe size mainly depends on the soil type and magnitude of current. Usually, for the ordinary soil, the pipe dimension should be 1.5 inches in diameter and 9feets in length. For rocky or dry soil, the pipe diameter should be greater than the ordinary soil pipe. The soil moisture will decide the pipe’s length to be placed in the earth. The pipe earthing diagram is shown below:





Rod Earthing System
This type of earthing system is similar to pipe earthing system. A copper rod with galvanized steel pipe is placed upright in the ground physically or using a hammer. The embedded electrodes lengths in the earth decrease the resistance of earth to a preferred value.


Contact us today and get your earthing done as per IEEE80 international standards.

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